Basically I'm really gay and really into Pokemon and boys. My name is Gage and I'm 17 I guess.

Anonymous asked:

YOU COULD SPELL "FISH" AS "GHOTI" AND IT WOULD BE PRONOUNCED THE SAME

factsinallcaps:

THIS IS NOT TRUE.

FOR THOSE UNAWARE OF THIS, UH, “FACT,” THE IDEA IS THAT “GHOTI” COULD BE PRONOUNCED “FISH” IF YOU PRONOUNCE THE GH- AS IN “LAUGH,” THE -O- AS IN “WOMEN,” AND THE “TI” AS IN “AMBITION.”

HOWEVER, THIS FAILS TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THAT THE PRONUNCIATION OF LETTERS IS DEPENDENT ON THEIR POSITION WITHIN THE WORD.

AT THE END OF A WORD OR SYLLABLE, “GH” CAN BE PRONOUNCED LIKE THE LETTER F. THIS IS WHY IT’S PRONOUNCED THAT WAY IN “LAUGH” AND “LAUGHTER” AND “ENOUGH” AND, DEPENDING ON WHO YOU ASK, “VAN GOGH.” AT THE BEGINNING OF A WORD OR SYLLABLE, “GH” IS PRONOUNCED AS AN EXTRA-HARD G-SOUND, AS IN “GHOST” AND “GHOUL” AND “GHASTLY.”

LIKEWISE, “TI” IS NOT PRONOUNCED AS “SH” AT THE END OF A WORD. IN “AMBITION,” IT IS ONLY BECAUSE “TI” IS FOLLOWED BY “O” THAT THERE IS AN “SH” SOUND IN THE WORD AT ALL. THIS IS WHY “RATIO” IS PRONOUNCED WITH AN “SH” SOUND, WHILE “MANTIS” IS PRONOUNCED WITH A “T” SOUND. 

IT’S ALSO IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT, IN WORDS LIKE “AMBITION” AND “NATION,” IT’S NOT THAT THE “TI” IS PRONOUNCED LIKE “SH.” “TION” IS A COMPLETE SYLLABLE, PRONOUNCED “SHUN” OR “SHEN.” IF YOU REMOVE ANY OF THE LETTERS, THE PRONUNCIATION WOULD CHANGE.

"ION" DOESN’T HAVE AN SH- SOUND IN IT. "TIN" DOESN’T HAVE AN SH- SOUND IN IT. "TI" DOESN’T HAVE AN SH- SOUND IN IT. "TON" DOESN’T HAVE AN SH- SOUND IN IT. "TIO" ONLY HAS AN SH- SOUND IN IT IF IT’S PRECEDED BY A VOWEL, AS IN "RATIO," AND EVEN THEN, IT’S PRONOUNCED "SHYO" OR "SHI-O," DEPENDING ON YOUR ACCENT. 

"O" IS RARELY PRONOUNCED AS IN "WOMEN," EXCEPT WHEN IT’S IN THE MIDDLE OF A SYLLABLE. 

THAT’S THE THING. “-GH” IS ONLY PRONOUNCED “F” AT THE END OF A SYLLABLE. “O” IS ONLY PRONOUNCED AS IN “WOMEN” IN THE MIDDLE OF A SYLLABLE. “TI-” IS ONLY PRONOUNCED “SH” AT THE BEGINNING OF A CERTAIN SYLLABLES, AND NEVER BY ITSELF.

WHEN ASSEMBLED IN THAT ORDER, NONE OF THOSE PRONUNCIATIONS WOULD APPLY. IF THEY HAD SPELLED IT “GHOTION,” IT WOULD BE PRONOUNCED “GOSHEN.” IF THEY HAD IT “LAUGHOTI,” IT WOULD BE PRONOUNCED “LAFF-OH-TEE.” 

HOWEVER, SPELLED “GHOTI,” THERE’S NO WAY TO PRONOUNCE IT “FISH” UNLESS YOU PRONOUNCE EVERY LETTER INCORRECTLY, IN WHICH CASE YOU’RE NOT PRONOUNCING “GHOTI” AT ALL, YOU’RE PRONOUNCING “FISH.” “GHOTI” IS PRONOUNCED “GOATY.”

NOW, THE ORIGINAL IDEA BEHIND “GHOTI” WAS MAKING FUN OF THE LACK OF RULES GOVERNING ENGLISH SPELLING AND PRONUNCIATION. THIS IS STUPID AS HELL, BECAUSE THEY HAD TO IGNORE A BUNCH OF THE RULES GOVERNING ENGLISH SPELLING AND PRONUNCIATION IN ORDER TO MAKE FUN OF THEIR NON-EXISTENCE.

THEY LITERALLY PRETENDED THE ESTABLISHED PRONUNCIATION CONVENTIONS DIDN’T EXIST JUST SO THEY COULD MAKE FUN OF ENGLISH FOR NOT HAVING ESTABLISHED NAMING CONVENTIONS, WHICH IS ESPECIALLY AGGRAVATING BECAUSE THIS COULD EASILY BE ACCOMPLISHED WITH THE EXISTING WORD “COLONEL.” 

kalany:

Dear followers,

  • have you eaten today?

  • did you take any meds you need?

  • how about hydration?

  • maybe a nap if you need one

  • you are awesome

  • keep it up

the-right-writing:

In real life, pretty much everybody reacts to tragedy differently. So why is it that every author has their pet reaction to tragedy that all their characters use? Not only is it unrealistic, but it takes away the chance for the characters’ different reactions to reveal…

hyrulewarriorprincess:

gassbung:

mlracles:

ottermatopoeia:

mattniskanenseyebrows:

OCTOBER IS NEXT WEEK

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OCTOBER IS THIS WEEK
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OCTOBER IS TOMORROW

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OCTOBER IS IN A COUPLE OF HOURS

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OCTOBER HAS BEGUN

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chaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaarlie:

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So in honor of it FINALLY being october 

(no idea where the gifs came from tell me and ill happily add credit)

Holy hell. Huge rant coming (Its positive don’t worry)

I’m grossly sobbing at like 11:30 because the stupid book Boy Meets Boy by David Levithan so you guys suffer the consequences with this rant.

Honestly I relate so much to this book right now like Paul speaks to me so well, in every way imaginable; we use the same slang/colloquialisms/terms/whatever the fuck you want to call it, from nifty to groovy to miffed and it just speaks to me. his feelings and emotions and his thoughts and the way he processed everything is so strong and i see myself in him so much its so scary and weird and i have such trouble coming to terms with it because it also made me realize a lot about myself that i didn’t even know before, how i act towards others how people treat me, the relationships i have with other people including my friend sydney who reminds me a lot of amber in this book. I honestly have reevaluated my life so much and its all because of this stupid little book like jesus christy its not even two hundred pages like what the fuck.

Another thing I realized is how closely this mirrors my feelings and thoughts about my group of friends. Its scary how splintery we are right now in my head, but i could be seeing it in a totally different light. who knows anything i just questioned my entire belief system because of a fucking sophomore named paul who has an existential crisis every chapter but like seriously i cannot ever unlearn the things i learned tonight about myself and my friends and just relationships in general, romantic, rivalries, or otherwise. I am so fucked up emotionally and mentally right now like I literally can not understand what i am feeling and how i’m processing this is like opening a floodgate inside myself like holy hell I’ve never spilled my heart and soul out here on tumblr or anywhere else before and this book just has me crying and freaking out and being totally shocked in every way like oh my god.

lyths:

So today I was re-reading Two Boys Kissing (shown above) and I thought to myself- why doesn’t tumblr ever talk about David Levithan?

Let’s look at some of his work

Boy Meets Boy: his debut novel, published ten years ago, where a boy meets another boy and they date. But that’s not all. It’s set in a town that accepts not only gays, but everybody. Did I mention there’s a male to female transgender that is not only the star of the football team, but also the prom queen?

Every Day: A book about ‘A’- someone who wakes up every day (hence title) in another person’s body. Because of this, A has no gender or sexuality. A is just A and identifies as such.

Wide Awake: In which a gay, Jewish man becomes president of the United States.

The Lover’s Dictionary: A story told in dictionary entries where the main characters’ gender is never mentioned once- it’s left to the imagination.

Two Boys Kissing: Inspired by the true story of Matty and Bobby, who broke the record for the longest kiss. The narrators of this story is the generation of gay men who died to AIDS. Also, one of the main characters is a FTM.

That’s not even close to all of his books. An honorable mention is The Realm of Possibility which has gay, lesbian, and straight characters that all interlace in some way (plus Jamie, who’s gender is never mentioned). And let’s not forget he’s the co-writer to not only Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist but also Will Grayson, Will Grayson.

Did I mention he’s a homosexual YA author? Yeah, he’s that too. 

People should be reading more David Levithan.

I’ll see you later,’ he says, and as he does, he runs his finger briefly over my wrist. It passes over me like air, and makes me shiver like a kiss.

—David Levithan, Boy Meets Boy (via quoted-books)

I liked this guy a lot. And I thought he liked me a lot, but in truth he didn’t really like me at all.

—David Levithan, Boy Meets Boy (via mahalditangloveholicxx)

cinderellainrubbershoes:

REVIEW: Boy Meets Boyby David Levithan
Imagine a place where tall and stocky cross-dressers can also be captains of high school football teams; where cheerleaders ride Harleys in their performances; where the Boy Scouts renamed themselves the “Joy Scouts” after abolishing gay-unfriendly policies; where kindergarten teachers can write comments like “[he] is definitely gay and has a very good sense of self” on kids’ report cards; where boys who like boys can flirt with girls who like girls and it’s completely okay.
A modern-day gaytopia? You bet. David Levithan has created a hate-free world with remarkable and carefree precision in his debut LGBTQ novel, Boy Meets Boy. Now that the genius stage is set, let’s now take a peek at the storyline:
Boy Meets Boy. Boy Loses Boy. Boy Gets Boy Back.
Okay, so how do you gauge the greatness barometer of a novel when you know how the events will turn out in the end just by reading the title? When a book’s plot seems to be a little predictable, I don’t readily dismiss it as a bad piece of literature; I look at the characters, and if they are real enough—in an interesting three dimensional, I-can-feel-as-if-you’re-just-sitting-beside-me way—I set them as my new measurements and see how high the notch will shoot up as the story progresses.
That is basically what I did with this book, and I’m happy to say that the characters propelled the rather ordinary turn of events into more appealing scenes that kept me engaged with it until the end.
The story is told from the point of view of Paul, the center of a complicated love polygon and circle of friends. He shares his experiences—the blissful, the painful, the fun, and the bitter ones—that he got when Noah, his love interest, barged into his life. My favorite thing about Paul is how his tone is clear, crisp, comedic and always insightful. After just five pages or so, I know that the coming pages will elicit soft chuckles from me. He’s incredibly witty and sometimes snarky, making the story enjoyable despite the sizable amount of fluff and cheese that ooze whenever the two main characters are going all lovey-dovey over each other.
The initially smooth flow of Paul’s relationship with Noah is interrupted when Kyle, Paul’s ex-boyfriend, reestablishes communication and attempts to reignite their old flame. Although I don’t really root for Kyle and Paul, I still find myself admiring the former—all because of one scene. Kyle likes both boys and girls, and yet hates the word “bisexual”. There’s a scene where Paul suggests other labels like “duosexual” or “ambisexual”, then Kyle replies something along the lines of “Why do I need to have something to call myself? Why can’t I just be simply me?” Thumb up from me, dude. :D Even in a utopian society where you live in, everyone is still crazy with labels.
Then enters my favorite character: Tony. He is Paul’s best friend who, unfortunately, does not reside in the egalitarian town where Paul and his other friends live. He is a taciturn and sad young man, bounded by a short leash of time and parental strictness to his home. He must follow the Cinderella policies of his homophobic parents—be home at midnight or you’re grounded. All scenes with Tony in them are thought-provoking and poignant; in fact the chapter dedicated to him made me weep. His parents are overly religious, and they always pray loudly (with Tony in earshot) about his damned soul for being a member of the third sex. They also refer to his friends as ‘evil’s influences’.  This reminds me of what Jeanette Winterson said in her novel Oranges are Not the Only Fruit: what the church considers as great love (fanaticism) is actually a psychosis, and what makes homosexuals’ lives difficult is not their perversity but other people’s. I can feel this sentence wriggling in my head as I read about Tony’s life. How he is hurt—almost destroyed—by his love for his parents. How he knows it is hopeless to go out and capture some temporary bliss with his friends and yet scramble back to an unaccepting refuge when the Pumpkin Hour comes. How he smiles through it all and says he can do it, and struggles to let his parents know that he is more than just his sexuality, that he can be happy even if he’s not straight. For me, he definitely takes the cake.
There are a lot of other characters that play important roles in Paul’s life, but the ones I mentioned above resonated with me the most. See, if all you have is a good setting and unfettered characters…well, you have everything already, since you can still paint new colors to run of the mill events and give them some kind of a rebirth.
Full of optimism, love, and dreams, Boy Meets Boy offers a fresh view of a world through Levithan’s prophetic, rose-colored spectacles. It’s definitely a must-read for teens, both for gays and straights.

cinderellainrubbershoes:

REVIEW: Boy Meets Boy
by David Levithan

Imagine a place where tall and stocky cross-dressers can also be captains of high school football teams; where cheerleaders ride Harleys in their performances; where the Boy Scouts renamed themselves the “Joy Scouts” after abolishing gay-unfriendly policies; where kindergarten teachers can write comments like “[he] is definitely gay and has a very good sense of self” on kids’ report cards; where boys who like boys can flirt with girls who like girls and it’s completely okay.

A modern-day gaytopia? You bet. David Levithan has created a hate-free world with remarkable and carefree precision in his debut LGBTQ novel, Boy Meets Boy. Now that the genius stage is set, let’s now take a peek at the storyline:

Boy Meets Boy. Boy Loses Boy. Boy Gets Boy Back.

Okay, so how do you gauge the greatness barometer of a novel when you know how the events will turn out in the end just by reading the title? When a book’s plot seems to be a little predictable, I don’t readily dismiss it as a bad piece of literature; I look at the characters, and if they are real enough—in an interesting three dimensional, I-can-feel-as-if-you’re-just-sitting-beside-me way—I set them as my new measurements and see how high the notch will shoot up as the story progresses.

That is basically what I did with this book, and I’m happy to say that the characters propelled the rather ordinary turn of events into more appealing scenes that kept me engaged with it until the end.

The story is told from the point of view of Paul, the center of a complicated love polygon and circle of friends. He shares his experiences—the blissful, the painful, the fun, and the bitter ones—that he got when Noah, his love interest, barged into his life. My favorite thing about Paul is how his tone is clear, crisp, comedic and always insightful. After just five pages or so, I know that the coming pages will elicit soft chuckles from me. He’s incredibly witty and sometimes snarky, making the story enjoyable despite the sizable amount of fluff and cheese that ooze whenever the two main characters are going all lovey-dovey over each other.

The initially smooth flow of Paul’s relationship with Noah is interrupted when Kyle, Paul’s ex-boyfriend, reestablishes communication and attempts to reignite their old flame. Although I don’t really root for Kyle and Paul, I still find myself admiring the former—all because of one scene. Kyle likes both boys and girls, and yet hates the word “bisexual”. There’s a scene where Paul suggests other labels like “duosexual” or “ambisexual”, then Kyle replies something along the lines of “Why do I need to have something to call myself? Why can’t I just be simply me?” Thumb up from me, dude. :D Even in a utopian society where you live in, everyone is still crazy with labels.

Then enters my favorite character: Tony. He is Paul’s best friend who, unfortunately, does not reside in the egalitarian town where Paul and his other friends live. He is a taciturn and sad young man, bounded by a short leash of time and parental strictness to his home. He must follow the Cinderella policies of his homophobic parents—be home at midnight or you’re grounded. All scenes with Tony in them are thought-provoking and poignant; in fact the chapter dedicated to him made me weep. His parents are overly religious, and they always pray loudly (with Tony in earshot) about his damned soul for being a member of the third sex. They also refer to his friends as ‘evil’s influences’.  This reminds me of what Jeanette Winterson said in her novel Oranges are Not the Only Fruit: what the church considers as great love (fanaticism) is actually a psychosis, and what makes homosexuals’ lives difficult is not their perversity but other people’s. I can feel this sentence wriggling in my head as I read about Tony’s life. How he is hurt—almost destroyed—by his love for his parents. How he knows it is hopeless to go out and capture some temporary bliss with his friends and yet scramble back to an unaccepting refuge when the Pumpkin Hour comes. How he smiles through it all and says he can do it, and struggles to let his parents know that he is more than just his sexuality, that he can be happy even if he’s not straight. For me, he definitely takes the cake.

There are a lot of other characters that play important roles in Paul’s life, but the ones I mentioned above resonated with me the most. See, if all you have is a good setting and unfettered characters…well, you have everything already, since you can still paint new colors to run of the mill events and give them some kind of a rebirth.

Full of optimism, love, and dreams, Boy Meets Boy offers a fresh view of a world through Levithan’s prophetic, rose-colored spectacles. It’s definitely a must-read for teens, both for gays and straights.

So you’re bisexual."
Kyle’s face flushes. “I hate that word,” he tells me, slumping back in his chair. “It makes it sound like I’m divided.”
“When really you’re doubled?”
“Right-O.

Boy Meets Boy by David Levithan (via ankhandarrow)

We found out a long time ago that we weren’t meant to fall in love with each other. But a part of me still fell in hope with him.

—Boy Meets Boy - David Levithan (via thatquote)

And I think to myself, what a wonderful word.

—David Levithan, from Boy Meets Boy (via the-final-sentence)